Accessibility is logical. Vale Mr Spock, vale Leonard Nimoy.

The Star Trek series was avant-garde not only because of its theme of the voyages of the Star Ship Enterprise in deep space, but also because it portrayed such an optimistic vision of the future.

The idea of men and women from different nations and races of planet Earth exploring the universe in peace, guided by the prime directive, appealed to my view of the world, to my sense of being a global citizen.

But the character of Spock took that idea to a higher dimension, with Spock, the half human-half Vulcan man, representing for me the idea that we all were citizens of the universe. And of course there was all the technology: including the visor that enabled Jordi, a blind character in Star Trek: The next Generation, to ‘see’ and become a Star Fleet officer and join the crew of the Enterprise.

Star Trek was the ultimate example of the philosophy of inclusion, the ideal that is the focus of the Digital Gap Initiative.

So it is natural that I should dedicate this first post, to the character that first awoke in me the belief that such an inclusive society was possible.

Leonard Nimoy played Spock to perfection, and I loved him as the human being he was, the actor he was, and as the character he was, and shall live on to be. Live long and prosper.